Louis XVI

Motifs and Characteristics: most of their motifs resemble uncharacteristic of the Rococo period. these in include flowers, shepherds, shepherdesses, bows, Chinoiserie, and singerie.

Architecture and Buildings: the designers and architects strive to maintain their geometric volumes, structural honesty, and simplicity. later in the century designers began to incorporate fanciful that were influenced by the English Picturesque.


Churches, palaces, and hotels still exist around that time. Newer building like markets, hospitals, theaters, and auditoriums are introduced.

Architects tried maintain their classical plans while trying to become more logic in thier space planning. It was antique meets modern. Very few buildings resembled the Gothic construction techniques.

Building material included brick, stone, and marble. cast-iron were used as extereior details.

Their roofs were flat with balustrades. windows are large, rectangular, and plain.

Exterior facades were composed of large geometric blocks and plain walls. Their walls were smooth, low-relief rustication highlights lower stories and some entrances. Their columns were not decorative but structural.

Interiors: Louis XVI interiors returned the classical attributes and decoration. Interiors maintained their human scale, light proportions, and charm of the Rococo style. In addition, the designers now are into emphasizing classical motifs, symmetry, and strait lines. Hierarchy and wealth status has no changed.

Their colors are now lighter and cooler, dominated by pale green, white, gray, blue, and pearl gray. Etruscan rooms usually had black and red and the dominate colors.

lighting generally remains the same as before. but no lanterns are becoming popular but not replacing candles.

Furniture: most of the furniture were made from mahogany and ebony. Gilding may have dominated the seat or painted on half of the seat. it was common to see natural seating without paint. Their furniture were geometrical.

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